About

“Native American Roots” is a blog dedicated to the genealogical and historical research of Native Americans of Granville County, North Carolina and neighboring counties. My name is Kianga Lucas and I am the author of this blog as well as a descendant of this tribal community. I hope this blog will better inform the public about the indigenous history and heritage of this region as well as aide other researchers. All content and opinions expressed in this blog are solely my own unless noted otherwise. Additionally, finding your ancestors within the research posted here does not guarantee enrollment within any Native American tribe. Tribal councils are sovereign governments and establish their criteria for enrollment.

My academic and professional background is in Anthropology, Native American Studies, and Museum studies. I’m a proud alumna of UMass Boston, where I graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. in Anthropology. I recently worked as a Curatorial Assistant at the Southwest Museum of the American Indian/Autry National Center in Los Angeles for five years and was most recently working towards my PhD in Anthropology/American Indian Studies at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. My CV and references are available upon request. I strive to make sure all information I publish is correct and verified but human error and mistakes are sure to happen in genealogical research. Please do contact me if you notice incorrect or questionable information.

You are welcomed to comment on blog posts just be sure to keep the language respectful. You are also welcomed to share your own genealogical research or inquire for more information. Please note I receive many genealogical inquiries on an almost weekly basis, and simply cannot respond to all. Furthermore, if the information requested is outside of my area of expertise, I won’t be much help. So I really do encourage you to leave comments with questions because other readers of this blog may be able to assist you.

If you are going to use information published from this blog which I highly encourage, please make sure to cite the blog properly. You can sign up to receive email updates from this blog by clicking the “FOLLOW” button on the front page.

54 thoughts on “About

  1. Looking forward to reading your blog and seeing more information out there about Native American ancestry. Many people do not understand that mulatto or free person of color does not always denote black or African ancestry. It can very well denote Native American ancestry….and we were not all removed to Oklahoma, many of us are still here. My roots go back to Person county to the Moore, Whitefield, Hargis, Towler, and Minchew line. My husband goes back to the Lunsford, Newton, Satterfield lines in Person county, with most living in and around Moriah, which borders Granville county. Thank you again for your hard work.

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    • Hi, Kianga, I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for this blog. I have a FB page called Gibsons of Old Jamestown and Louisa Co, VA you may have already seen. I am currently now trying to make the connections between the Evans’ family (descendants of Jane Gibson the Elder, Indian Woman and I am quite sure my aunt) and the Bradbys of the Pamunkey. If you have any thoughts on this, I would be interested. Evans Bradby born about 1840 was the sister of Caroline Bradby (who looks like many of my older Gibsons), she being the mother of Chief Major George Cook. I believe Jane may have been Chickahominy and she was,from Charles City Co, VA, born about 1640 with a brother and a son both named George Gibson. I know the son of John Bradby, preacher to the Indians, married a Chickahominy woman probably around 1740 and I wonder if she were an Evans’ descendant. Also, I have spent three winters examining microfilm of Surry Co, VA public records from the 1600’s and have found an enormous amount of information on the Chivers (Chavis), Gibson/Gibbons, Howell, Anderson, Pittman and other families. Thomas Gibson/Gibbons born about 1647 is my documented Indian/white grandfather whom I believe was the son of George and Mary Gibson of neighboring Charles City Co, VA, south bank of the James, renamed Prince George Co, VA in 1704. I think Jane was Thomas’ brother and the DNA is matching on these two individuals, autosomal DNA testing. It’s looking to me that George Gibson, probable father of Thomas Gibson/Gibbons, was the son of Thomas Gibson of the 1608 Second Supply Ship to Jamestown, he, Thomas, living among the Pamunkey in 1608, some kind of artisan, and soldier and mariner, working at building an Euopean home for Powhatan. I come from a long line of coopers, apparently tobacco cask makers, sawyers, right back through Thomas Gibson/Gibbons, as documented through public records. I believe I have traced the Thomas Gibson of the 1608 Second Supply to a London will first written in 1614 by a man named John Wilkinson, gentleman, who died in 1636. John mentions cousins Thomas and Edward Gibson (there was an Edward Gibson, a physician, in Jamestown in 1619 and he later is in Henrico Co, VA, same county as my grandfather Gilbert Gibson, it being a frontier and center for the Monacans at the time, about 1700). John also mentions their mother Lady Margaret Gibson and step father Henry Bowman and other relations, the Birds (same family as the Birds who settled in Charles City Co, VA in the mid 1600’s). Bowmans are found in Henrico Co, VA in the mid 1600’s and this family is related to the Evans and Redcrosses per the Evans’ Family Slave Petition of about 1804, Lunenberg Co, VA. An English literate York County court magistrate named Thomas Gybson, with a sister, Margaret Gybson Blakey, dies in Old Rappahannock Co, VA in 1652, leaving an extant will. His wife Elizabeth was married before him with her own family. He leaves 900 acres of land across from Pamunkey Landing up the York River (it may have been the Pamunkey River, but, I believe York??), about 25 miles from the outlet to his minor son Nicholas (we have confirmed Nicholas’ in my family) and he is living on the Northern Neck, northerly, (Warsaw, earlier named Richmond) in the same area as Powhatan’s Chimney in Werocomoco, southerly (remnant of home built for Powhatan by Thomas Gibson of the 1608 Second Supply and other men, most who were later executed by the chief). Our family oral history states that our progenitor Thomas Gibson moved in 1648 to Louisa Co, VA (this would have still been York Co, VA in 1648).This was the year, per public record, the Thomas Gybson above, was granted/bought 900 acres along the York (or Pamunkey) River. There is no record of Pamunkey Landing, but, it must have been a place where the Pamunkey traded or possibly lived. I think this Thomas Gybson may have been the Thomas Gibson of the 1608 Second Supply as many of the men in that Supply were gentleman, and due to primogeniture, needed to find a trade and have an adventure. Some did go back to England and returned to VA, and, Thomas, being a mariner, may have returned at some point, but, he did not return with Captain Christoper Newport a few months after the Second Supply ship landed in October, 1608. Any ideas on connecting Evans to Bradbys, early to mid 1700’s in VA is appreciated.
      Also, many of us Gibson descendants to this day are cross or lazy eyed, which is evident in the photos on your blog.

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      • Hi Rosalie. Thank you for reading the blog. And thank you for sharing this very valuable information. It will take me some time to review it all and research. So I will likely contact you in the future when I am able to dig in.

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    • Not sure how this works here, but, I should be replying to Patrick’s post of today, October 22nd (or it may have been yesterday). i am hoping others will also see what I am posting here re East Indian ancestry. My recent Gibson line is considered white and that is our haplogroup, as well. My dad, John Otto Gibson, who is almost 90, was both YDNA tested to the 67 marker level and autosomally DNA tested. His mother was full blooded German (possibly with some Turk origins though that may come through paternally with our Gibsons – we are of VA originally and considered melungeons and we stayed in VA for almost three hundred years which is an important note in isolating our data and research from NC, etc). My dad has 5% East Indian admixture, if that is the correct term. He is mostly UK, but, also French, Portugese and Spanish, with a good shot of African (Ethiopian, Tanzania and probably Angolan which is of south Africa). We know we are also Native American, but, the tests didn’t show this due to low sample populations of that groups and lack of statistical soundness. What is so intriguing is how and why we are East Indian. Dad has a significant percentage. I wonder if in fact it is truly AMERICAN Indian and NOT EAST Indian. When I questioned FTDNA, they insisted EAST Indian, but, I have found calling them and getting “answers” like calling the IRS, at times. The Dutch East India company of course traded into VA and of course had East Indian slaves and servants. I wonder if the Goins family has a high East Indian admixture, like Dad, as they may have been Portugese African slaves in the early 1600’s and my line does have black blood back 200-400 years, though, we were mostly white with a great deal of American Indian through the 1700’s. The Gibsons and Goins were strongly associated in Louisa Co, VA in the early to mid 1700’s and the Goins’ women appear to be liasons with some of my male Gibsons, like George Gibson, an uncle and brother to my gramp Gilbert Gibson. Gilbert was also in court re a Goins woman, for his usual non payment of “services.” The family was promiscuous and had numerous illegitimate children, per oral family history and public records so, research gets dicey. So, back to East India. I know the Weavers of the Nansemond tribe were of East Indian descent and some of my early Gibson family photos show some of our men who look VERY unusual, like African, or Indian or possibly East Indian or something – very large heads and shaped strangely, definately not European looking. It’s almost the same head shape of some of the John White drawings of NC Indians done in the mid 1590’s or so. And, very similar head shape of Opecanenough (sp) in the engraving of him with Capt. Smith grabbing him, threatening to blast him. The Weaver family photo from circa 1900 on line shows the patriarch with a similar type of East Indian head shape. Anyway, all I can figure is some of the East Indian servants/slaves beat feet, like some of the African slaves and other FPC, to live among the VA tribes in the 1600’s, a very common practice. If anyone has anymore info about the Nansemond Weavers, I would be interested. I can’t find much about East Indian servants in Jamestown, but, there is something in the mid 1690’s about them. Also, ther is talk our Gibsons were of gypsy descent and gypsies descend from North India, apparently. Lots of gypsies were deported out of the UK in the mid to late 1600’s as indentured servants, so, this may be the origin of the East Indian admixture. Thanks, Joan Rosalie Gibson

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      • Hello Joan,
        It seems that our lines may cross. My mother line has dodsons/dotsons on her fathers side that were from Jamestown. They were mixed White/Native and suppose to be descendants from one of Pocahontas sisters. It seems a lot of people in Pittsylvania County, VA. both Black/White and Native claimed they were descended from Pocahontas family. So much that Pocahontas or Pokey was a common name among girls in the County. I just Googled “Pocahontas Pittsylvania County, VA.” and a Pocahontas Gibson came up. It looks like she married into the Oakes family which was a very large family in the County. There were also many Goins/Goings living in the County as well that the Lumbee’s down in Robeson County, NC claim. I have a book for the registry of FPOC in Pittsylvania County that goes back pretty far up to the 1850’s.
        i have a lot of East Indian markers and i thought they were mismatched as well until i started more research. I really didn’t consider that my East Indian DNA could have came from Pittsylvania County but it could of. Many FPOC in Virginia moved and registered in Pittsylvania County after it was established. So far, I’ve been concentrating on Northumberland, Accomac, Lancaster and other coastal counties since I have known ancestors that lived in those areas but will start looking closer to home as well.

        Patrick Watkins

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      • When speaking of DNA (of which I am very illiterate, having only done DNA through Ancestry.com). But there is a book I am sure you have heard of called “Old World Roots of the Cherokee”. On pages 55-57 (or so) he talks about my 7x G-GM, Betsy Walker, who was full Cherokee. They have found that early Cherokee did not come across the Berring (sp?) Straights as most Native Americans, but actually came in ships hundreds of years before Columbus. Betsy’s female descendants showed Hapalong type “J” which says she is of Jewish descent. “J” is a very rare type and the book explains the reason the author believes this is ancient DNA rather than later generations who may have intermarried into this group.
        this is my Great Grandmother’s line on my mother’s female line. In her Gibson line, I have traced my ancestry back to Powhatan, Henrico, and surrounding counties in VA. My 6x Great Grandfather was Thomas Gibson, who married Elizabeth Worley in this area about 1740. I cannot find documentation about this Thomas Gibson, but my DNA has many hits on Thomas Gibson who died in 1734 who married Mary Francis Allen. Their daughter, Mary, married Jacob Flournoy. I have found these Flournoys in records about the Worley family and they also intermarried. Also, My Great Grandmother Gibson told her children they are Black Dutch.
        I believe we descend from the Thomas Gibson who went to Jamestown in 1608, and that my 6x G-GF came straight down that line.
        How do I find out how to do DNA connecting us to this line? We do have direct male lines in this family. My DNA shows I have a trace amount of European Jewish. Is there a test available that can show if you are connected to these early Gibson’s?
        I would appreciate help with this. Thanks
        Carole Burris

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  2. Hi,
    I live in a community in Vigo County Indiana, whose settlers originated in North Carolina, and are of all of the families mentioned in this blog. I have a website, which has the genealogy of the majority of these settlers. The website is: http://lost-creek.org/genealogy/index.php
    I am looking for the owner of this page, to get permission to use part or all of this webpage on my website, All credit and recognition will go to the owner of the page, of course. I do not wish to violate any copyrights.
    Thanks,
    Jim Shepard

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    • Hi Jim,
      Thank you for getting in touch. I am very familiar with your website since many of the families in your community came from Granville County. There will be future blog posts discussing the migration of some of these families from Granville out to Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, etc. I hope we can work together to correctly piece together family trees. So yes, please use and cite any information found within my blog. If you would like to correspond further, please email me kiangalucas@gmail.com
      Best,
      Kianga

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  3. Thank you so very much for putting this all together. I have been looking into this family and descendants for a while. I can finally understand it in this format. The stories and the pictures are amazing. Great research and analysis as well. I see I have more reading to do!

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  4. I am really enjoying reading your blog. I currently live in Henrico, NC which is very near many of the sites you have identified. I previously lived in Suffolk, VA and I am very familiar with the Nansemond tribe and their history. Keep up the great work.

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  5. Hello, I noticed in your articles that If we wanted to speak with you regarding any additional information. For us to contact you. I would like to speak with you in more depth regarding both sides of my family. My Maiden name is “Hedgepeth” (my dad is from the Halifax area) and My married side “Boone” (We still reside in Gates Co,NC).
    I also would like to find out more information regarding my family From Roxboro NC; Surname “Minis” (Possible Native Roots that traveled from the Chickasaw Nation as well.
    Thank You So Much!

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    • BTW- Since I live here in Gates Co./”BooneTown”. I do have quite a bit of family information that I’ve Personally collected from different Family Members. As well as the Gates County Historian. I started researching the family as soon as I married into the family (As well as Updated the family tree at the Family Reunion several years ago. I don’t mind sharing the information that I have if needed. ) Also,since my Husband is a Boone on Both sides (Mother and Father) he also has a “Wealth” of information as well. And my father is still alive, and continues to speak with the “Older” family in Holister. So he is also able to recollect quite a bit of information regarding his Hedgepeth/Jones family as well.

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  6. Lila,
    I have been working on the ancestry of The Lost Creek Settlement, here in Vigo County, Indiana. That ancestry almost all goes back to North Carolina, and to the Lumbee Reservation.
    You mention the families of Minnis and Hedgepath. My ancestor, Jethro Bass, had a daughter, Duphena Emily Bass, who married an Edward Minnis, and they lived in Illinois. Into this family, a Milton Tyler married Fannie Minnis, and a Permelia Ann Minnis who married William Roberts, and Lucy Ann Minnis married George Manuel. i also have Lincoln Hedgepath in my tree, who married a Carrie Roberts.
    I would love to share information with you.
    Thanks,
    Jim Shepard
    james@shepard.net

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    • Thank You James! Im glad to meet you 🙂
      The Minnis Line I am Very curious about! I see there are many families “West” of North Carolina.
      I have spoken to an older family member. From what I can tell, the Grandparent I have been trying to find more information about is George Washington Minnis. He is also listed on the Chickasaw Infantry Rolls. From what Ive seen he had a brother named John Minnis Jr. (Possibly named after their father). When I spoke to the Chickasaw Nation. They stated that during the time of Treaties (with the US.) Several members were upset that the treaties were signed.
      And they left the area. Several moving to North Carolina. From my understanding from my family members, they intergrated with the African American families to keep from being Persecuted. Aparently this grandfather Died somewhat young.

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    • I am also a descendant of Emily Duphena Bass who married Charles “Ned” Minnis . My gg-grandfather was Charles Edward Minnis He had two sons with Capitola Minnis before she died, Frank and Louis Maceo Minnis. Frank was my maternal grandmothers father. The death certificate for Charles Edward Minnis says his mother was born in Indianapolis IN about 1834 (possibly an error) the family was in Harrison Township Vigo in the census and that Ned Minnis was born in Louisville KY. I have recently taken the DNA test and am very close to receiving my results. My journey discovering my ancestors’ past has been very exciting!

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  7. I was excited to find this blog and read such rich information. I have been working on my ‘family tree’ for several years and know for a fact that my family are descendants of Native Americans on both my dad and mom’s side of the family. I am from Chillicothe, Ohio.

    On my dad’s side, we are descendants of the Chavis family. I will begin with John Chavis born March 1822 in Virginia. He finally settled in Gallia County Ohio and was vey instrumental in the Underground Railroad.

    Do you have any information on any Glascoe family from Virginia, particularly Jane Glascoe? I know for sure she was Native American.

    On my mom’s side, we are descendants of the Locklear family. Soloman Elijah Locklear was born May 20, 1850 in North Carolina. His father was James Locklear and mother was Comilera Jones, both born in North Carolina. Soloman was married to Margaret Anderson who was born in 1852 in North Carolina.

    If you have any additional information about any of my family members, I would love to hear about them and read more on their lives.

    Thanks again for an outstanding site to read and enjoy about our heritage.

    Jill

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  8. Hi Kianga, You’ve done a lot of great work here. Really helpful. My matrilineal line takes me to the Taborn clan in North Carolina. I’ve been trying to understand more, especially as pictures of the older generation show the ladies to be clearly of Native American descent, but my own grandmother was very reticent about the family history. The family always said Cherokee, but when I couldn’t find any family members in Cherokee areas, not even in NC, I figured that was just a well known tribe they could identify. Have you found any connection between the Taborns and any specific tribe?

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    • Denise,

      Thank you for checking the blog. Can you provide me the names of your Taborn ancestors? I’ll look them up in my family tree database. This will help me thoroughly answer your question about tribal affiliation. And yes the Taborns are Native Americans, but not Cherokees. I will be doing a future blog post about the “Cherokee” label that has been attached to many of our communities in NC.
      If you’d like to follow up via email – kiangalucas@gmail.com

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  9. Hi Kianga,I have have an ancestor named John Anderson who was born in 1831 at Granville Co, NC. Would he be part saponi Indian or something like that. Thank you.

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  10. Hello,
    I am descended from the Watkins/Guy Saponi families and was wondering if anyone has yet to compile a Saponi DNA study of the related families? My Automosal DNA results show a 30%-40% American Native, 30% European, 20% African and 10%-20% East Indian admixture. Both my Paternal and Maternal families are descended from FPOC families of Virginia/NC. My Paternal or Y-DNA descends from my fifth great grandfather Isaac Watkins who was born in the 1790’S in St. Andrews parish, Brunswick County, VA. It shows a strong possible paternal match to the Bolling family along with Y-DNA matches to the Green and Nichols families of Early Virginia. My Mom’s mTDNA is of a East African/Ethiopian origin with most of her matches in Cuba, Puerto Rico Jamaica and Louisiana. Many of our population matches are verifiable with our documented family tree but, I was surprised by the matches to the Navajo and Apache of the Southwest US on both sides of my family.

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    • I am also interested in the Watkins Saponi/ Native Families in VA. My Native line goes back to Watkins. I know this post is old, email me if you receive this.

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  11. Greetings Kianga,

    My name is Roderick Terrence Daye. I am from Granville County. I am interested in the excellent research you have been doing on the Native American families. I also take it that we are distant cousins, as it seems several times over.

    My father is Lincoln Stafford Daye and on his side of the family, I am related to: Day(e), Ash(e), Anderson, Taborn, Mangum, Green, Rattley, Burwell, Perry, Fogg, Bibby, Young, Tally and Bass.

    My mother is Rosalyn Annette Hicks Daye and on her side of the family, I am related to: Hicks, Moore, Pettiford, Young, Hardin(g), Curtis, Green, Sanford, Pettiford, Parker, Brandon, Guy and Bass.

    I see that you gave me credit for a couple of the pictures that you had used which I had uploaded on Ancestry. One photo was of my paternal great grandmother Cappie Frances Anderson Daye and the other was of a photo of my maternal 2nd great grandfather, Alford Pettiford.

    I have more photos available of some of the older members of the family.

    If you have anything you would like to share regarding these branches of the family, I would be most appreciative.

    I would be nice if there were a Native American organization for Granville County as it seems joining any of the surrounding Native American tribes seems to be a bit difficult as many of their rolls tend to be closed currently.

    I am looking forward to hearing back from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    Rod

    Roderick T. Daye, M.Ed., CYT, CPT

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    • Hello Roderick,
      We have Guy family connections back to Mecklenburg County, VA. and possibly Bass and Day. My Guys and Watkins of Caswell County, NC lived next to Bass and Day’s FPOC in the early 1800’s for many years. I’m finding out thru this blog that many of these families moved to Granville County later on. Have you looked into doing any DNA testing on yourself or any family members. I’ve done mine thru Family Tree DNA for a small fee and got back a lot of DNA cousins. A few of my 2nd-3rd Cousins I can connect back to recent ancestors in my Tree. I am also looking into connections to the Green family of Brunswick County, VA. since i have a couple of Green descendant matches on my Paternal dna. To my surprise I have a lot of East Indian chromosomes and i’m now researching possible connections with early NC/Virginia families of East Indian descent.

      Patrick Watkins

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  12. I am wondering if any research has been done on the connection of the above mentioned people to the counties of southwest Virginia, like Patrick, Henry, Floyd, Wythe, Bedford and Franklin. I was told grandfathers roots were Blackfoot Indian and Shawnee. My grandfather’s grandfather was Stewart Franklin Reynolds, but listed as Franklin Stuart in an early cohabitation record of Floyd Co. 1860s and Stewart Franklin in the 1870 census. By 1880 he is named Stuart Franklin Reynolds. His father was named Charles, but was the son of the Reynolds slave owner. Stuart’s daughter married a William Burnard whose wife’s is named Indianna or Indi Burnett in her death record, daughter of Richard and Fannie Goins. The mother in law of William is named Rose Parker.
    I think some of my Reynolds family may have been named in Patrick Co. as free colored Stuarts/Stewarts in the 1830s through 50s. There is a Franklin, Charles, George Stuart named who may have come from the same family or been ancestors of my ggrandfather “Franklin Stuart” or Stuart Franklin Reynolds. The reason I am asking about this Stuart surname is because the photo of the man Richard Stuart on this page is the spitting image of my ggrandfather Franklin Stuart. They have to be related somehow. The name Thomas, Archer, Franklin and Charles appear to have run in the Stewart free -colored family but I am surmising some of them had ended up slaves on the tobacco plantations.
    According to my dad’s aunt on this grandfather’s maternal side was his grandfather named Jake Hale. who claimed descent from the Hale tobacco peoplas well,e but also was said to be for the most part a”wild” Indian who caught and ate snakes and was a medicine person or “doctor” according to my grandfather’s sister. She also said he looked “just like Cochese” and used to work in a rum distillery. This Jake’s wife’s last name was also Reynolds. Its funny because that side of the family lived right next to the Indianna Goins, Parker, Burnett family that my grandfathers paternal side married into. The only child I could find in this family living next door elsewhere seemed to have been named Ann Goings b. circa 1841 who lived in Patrick in 1850 next to the Alias Findlay- Goings families – Findlay being the name of Choctaws according to records I saw of Patrick County. I can’t find where any of the other children of these Burnett, Goins, Parker people went in that time other than this Ann. William Burnard’s father appears to have been a Dennis Pullen (Bollin?).
    My dna shows a close relationship to many people with the Parker and Lucas surname and I didn’t think I was related to any Parkers until I looked at the people living next to my Hale-Reynolds gggrandparents. The son of Stewart, my ggrandfather Walton, married Sarah Hale my ggrandmother, daughter of Jake. One of the Hale daughters Sallie Champs Hale married a Preston Bibby of Amherst County. Another daughter married a Megee. My grandfather’s Hale cousin married the daughter of a Scott. Other Hales in Franklin, Bedford and Amherst were married to Branhams, Chavers/Chavis, Mullins, Anderson, Maynard/Minards and Mitchells almost all classified as Melungeon or Indian at some point. In Bluefield, West Virginia Sara Hale and Walt Reynolds were living next door to mulatto Watkins that were later classified as white. I think they were related because they apparently owned a grocery store together.
    Some Turners from Henry and Floyd Counties in Virginia next to Patrick and Franklin married by a Rev. John Gibson are named cousins to the Reynolds wife of Jake in a 1900 census. The Harris name is also connected with our family tree as cousins. They lived in Henry County and the earliest recorded was a Green or Granville Harris. My aunt said my grandfather spoke about us being related to Daniel Boone as well ( not sure if he was was kidding or not). And now I see the Boone name on here. My brother’s name interestingly is Guy, but not sure if that means anything. : )
    Funny thing I met some women who looked just like me in New York a few years back I have a strange or very unique look, with strongly aquiline nose like my grandfather Stuart. They agreed that we all looked like we could be sisters and when I asked about the surnames that ran in their family they mentioned Howell and Megee from North Carolina. Another person I met in New Jersey that looked a lot like my father who is in his 80s said he was from Danville, Virginia, last name Valentine.
    I’m just trying to find out the direct ancestors of all the Hale, Turner, Reynolds, Stuart, Bibby and apparently Goings, Parker, Burnett people in my family that were claiming to be Indian living in Franklin, Floyd, Amherst and Henry Counties and espcially in the Blackwater region. Are they the same Bibby’s as on this page. I need to find out why Richard Stuart looks so much like my grandfather. From what I hear people called Turners were part founders of the Nottoway and the Reynolds of the Meherrin tribe. Most of my family on these lines ended up in Fayette or Huntington and Kanawha, West Virginia in the 1900s and finally in Ohio where my father’s from.

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    • My Gibson family settled in the Kanawha, WV area in the mid 1800’s from Bath and Louisa Counties, VA (as did our cousins the Bramhams). What was the name of your family that settled in Kanawha? We are associated with the Andersons, Turners, Goins and many others back into VA in the late 1600’s and early 1700’s. We descend from Elizabeth Chavis and Thomas Gibson/Gibbons of Surry Co, VA (mid 1600’s) and Edmond Howell was the godfather to Thomas and Elizabeth’s son, Gibson Gibson. The Andersons were heavily allied with my Gibsons and the Turners married into the Gibson (I think they may have been Nansemonds??). I am pretty sure Thomas was Chickahominy (and, of course, English or Scots) and I think was the brother to Jane Gibson, the Elder, Indian Woman. Re the Stuarts, they are a Pamunkey tribal family and Ken Bradby on his blog spot has a long list of Pamunkey families who sought reparation just after the Civil War. (We look like Stuarts and the Gibsons and Collins heavily intermarried and later became known as Saponi.) You may want to check this out. You have a lot of untangling to do (I know the feeling). Also, if you are resembling people, as you mention in your comment, or other of your family members are, that’s a huge red flag. There are only 8-9 genes out of 125,000 that give us our looks, so, it’s not unusual for us to look like relatives from several centuries back and that has been my experience in my genealogical research as I examine photos from the mid 1800’s and also current photos of VA tribal members. I have an FB page called “Gibsons of Old Jamestown and Louisa Co, VA” with some photos and lots of links and research. Kianga’s photos are tremendous as well as her research. So many of her photos resemble my family and we all seem to descend from the very early, early Gibsons and local VA tribes.. I have my Gibsons documented to the 1640’s into Charles City Co, VA and it’s looking by that early date we were already first and second generation mulatoos (Indian and white), mostly Indian. I think quite possibly they descend f rom Thomas Gibson of the 1608 Second Supply Ship to Jamestown and a Pamunkey or Chickahominy wife. He was a soldier and some of those guys were billeted out among the early VA tribes because the English were starving. We look Chickahominy, Pamunkey, Mattaponi, and Monacan to this day, particularly, my dad.

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      • I need to find out how I am related to people like the Gibsons and Parkers and Goins. I just know the Turners were cousins because it says so on the censuses. I know that a John W.. Gibson was the surety in one marriage. His father may have been a John M. Gibson from Lynchburg, VA. I happen to be directly descended from Scottish Gibsons on my mother’s non-Indian side as well. Walter M. Gibson married a Judah Johnson. I don’t know which tribe we look like all I know is the hair never turns grey and the eyes are sometimes very close together, like in the Time Life books of Indians. I know the Hales that are in West Virginia still have an Asian look to them. . I didn’t know that about the 8 or nine genes so that explains why so many people coming from that area look like me while no one else does. I have also had other people mention that i look like people in a certain part regions that claim to be have Indian blood, so I am now sure its not just my imagination. I see the Stewarts include one current chief of the Chickahominy. My grandfather’s mother claimed they were “Blackfoo”t though and that the Blackfoot were originally from South Carolina. She was the Hale whose mother had a cousin was a Turner.
        My Hales I know had settled in Kanawha and in the Huntington area especially. They were connected with the Scotts their. The vast majority of the people that went to West Virginia ended up in Fayette County, some in Mercer. I had forgotten my Stuart Reynolds people are also found in some marriage records in Caswell County in the 1880s. One married the daughter of a Mary Logan (Liggans). granddaughter of Peter Estes Logan.
        Thanks for your response. Will try to look up on Ken Bradby’s blog.

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      • Aah, “the never greying hair.” I am almost 60 years old and my hair is the same as it was when I was a teenager, except for a very few, unnoticeable white hairs. My dad, John Otto Gibson, didn’t even partially grey up until his early 80’s. My autosomal DNA on gedmatch shows a huge amount of matches to Turners, like just about ALL Turners. Very weird. I am not sure if this is because somewhere I had a Turner grandmother and it was NOT Sarah, below, or if they are descending from Gilbert Gibson (my grandfather born in the 1690’s and later died in Louisa Co, VA in 1763 and a true rascal and apparently very Native American and a wealthy plantation owner whose second young wife was Sarah Turner LeMay probably a Monacan. Sarah was a pistol, fierce, a fighter and did what she could to raise her young children after Gilbert died. His first family of kids and Sarah and her kids duked it out in court for like forty years over the distribution of Gilbert’s estate. She changed his will on his deathbed, apparently, per some deposition. It all left a rich plethora of public records with depositions and a lot of dirt on my Gibsons of Louisa Co, VA who were just wild in many ways. The family eventually dispersed into other states because the fighting was so unpleasant, from what I was told by one branch that moved into Doddridge Co, WV in the mid 1850’s – the Pinkard Bramham/Mary Eliza Gibson branch). If you have aDNA on gedmatch, you will be able to see what other families you are related to. It’s complex stuff, but, quite helpful. I think I told you I have an FB page called “Gibsons of Old Jamestown and Louisa Co, VA.” It has some good links and other info and early VA is the focus and it is largely Native American bent as this was what I discovered as I continued researching back into time re my Gibsons. Your line may be easier to research than you think. The Turners are somewhat well documented and were Saponis who left Louisa Co, VA in the mid 1740’s for NC, with some of my Gibsons. This small band of Saponi were mustered in the 1652 NC militia, living on Col. Eaton’s land and apparently were Indian traders. Actually, I think orginally the Turners they may have been Nansemond who were from the county (Isle of Wight) just east of Surry Co, VA in the 1600’s. What’s really kind of bizarre is if you go to my FB page there is an old photo of Joseph Collins with a large black hat, an older Saponi man, and also a photo of my gg grandfather George William Gibson, born in 1840 in VA, sitting with his large family in 1902 in Altizer, Calhoun Co, VA You will be utterly speehless at how identical these two men resemble one another!!. They are even sitting the same way. The Collins (a well documented Pamunkey family) and Gibsons intermarried incessantly for what may have been two hundred years. There is a John Collins found in Surry Co, VA the same time my grandfather Thomas Gibson/Gibbons is there, mid to late 1600’s (the population there wasn’t that large in the 1670’s but absolutely burgeoned in the 1680’s and my people beat feet as they have always had to be isolated from people for many good reasons, largely, being mixed race, I believe, and many followed the Indian trading paths) and Henry Collins and a Thomas Gibson came over together in 1608 on the Second Supply Ship to Jamestown. Usually, where there is a Collins, there is a Gibson.

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    • Hi Dana. Thanks for reading the blog. I have not done research in those areas so I’m afraid I can’t be of much help. Hopefully others reading the blog can point you in the right direction and give you some pointers.

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    • Dana, great post! I have been wondering the same.. These surnames abound in southwest Va, NC line counties as you mentioned..even into West Va. I have Hale/Haile, Mitchell, Lawson-Mabe ancestry, my daughters have Valentine/Mayo, and Blevins (Long-Hunters, traders with the NA).. And SEVERAL more Surnames which all almost always “neighbors” or have close friendships with the Saponi, Cherokee, Melungeons, I believe most of my suspected NA relatives “blended” well into white culture for various reasons at a time in history where they felt they needed to.. It’s sad to think about but I am proud of my heritage..

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    • Dana, again.. I agree! My husband is from Va, I’m from NC… We never knew each other until we were 29 and 34, he moved to NC and we met, had an instant connection, turns out, we share 4, (and counting!) sets of ggg grandparents! Yuck, but hey, whatcha gonna do? Anyway, I got off topic.. Hubby’s great grandpa WHITT as a young boy in family pictures looks identical to my hubby’s son. I would post a pic here if it was possible.. It’s ironic, very dark straight thick hair with narrow deep set Asian eyes but a flatter nose, very Melungeon looking if u ask me..! They called it Black Dutch though.. My husband has several siblings and numerous nieces/nephews but they all have that same common look.. At last count, we share Moran grandparents, Hales, Griffiths, Cannady/Cannaday… But I look much more European thanks to my German/Sweedish/Scandinavian Ancestry… He’s 45 and hair still dark as ever..speaking of the NC/VA counties I have deep roots in Stokes Co, NC , Stuart/Patrick Co Va.. If you ever run across a James “Coowasuliskee” Davis, tribe leader (signed the Treaty of Tellico )…his daughter Anna Davis Mitchell born abt. l774(born in Stokes Co. Cherokee Nation) Married Hugh Mitchell.. Anna and Hugh match as my 5th ggrandparents. I want more solid documentation/proof of this.. Chapman Roll has a James as a young boy in Tenn around 8-9yr that matches pretty solid with his general birth/death dates and he did come to NC from TN etc.. But I would like further documentation on Anna Davis and was Hugh Mitchell white or Partly NA.. Lots of questions with this line.. DAVIS-MITCHELL-MITCHELL-WARD-MORTON–YOUNG- down to my mom then me..South Stokes Co. Was even “Sauratown” Saura Indians, and I just don’t find a lot of links or resources for the area to have such a rich history of NA families.. You may want to check out New River Notes? I believe the website is called, it seems to have some good information on Those Va/NC county families… Going to check out youR FB page.. Love the photos on this site, can’t wait to see more.. Beautiful folks With a Unique heritage

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      • I am a Kennett from Franklin County, with lots of Cannady/Cannday marriages. I descend from William Patrick Billy Cannaday of Patrick coubt.y va. I have done a lot of research, I’m trying to find out about one of their 24 children named Martha who is my ancestor. My grandmother was very native american some say Cherokee and Sioux. She was old and senile when I was young. Other family names are Thornton, Ferguson/Fergerson, Scott, Day, Kinnett, Shortt, Thomas. The Thornton’s are from Rockingham NC, then moved to goosepond lake Oglethorpe ga. They were neighbors of Merryweather lewis and a sister of one of my ancestors married Merryweather lewis after he returned. There are marriages with the Gaye’s and Bollings but on not seeing so much Indian as my grandma was. One Kennett ancestor served under Nathaniel Gist Sequoyahs father though I don’t know if he was Cherokee or just Virginian since gist had both in his regiment. They were boatmen, then steamboat men later.

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  13. I am the Great Great Great Grand Daughter of Lewis Levy, The great Granddaughter of James Levy and the Granddaughter of Bessie Levy. We are so excited to read all of your works. My father, Robert Tyler has done 40 years of research on the same line and actually wrote a fictional/historical novel on the Levy Family. He and my mother traveled to Guadeloupe to research French Mary. We live outside of Boston and would love to meet you. I have reached out through your Facebook page.
    Would love to hear from you.

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  14. First I would like to thank you for your research on Willis Bass, my family. I had always believed that when we were told our Y-DNA didn’t match Bass meaning we weren’t Bass, I had to sit back for a moment. Then my mind went directly aw ha we must of came from a mother’s named Bass. I have seen Heinng’s writing and knew it couldn’t be right! I found in the archives that said Willis was born 1788 where he married Olive Chavers/Chavis in 1809. Problem #1 My Elijah Bass, Jr said it was Olive Stewart could she have been both last names? Since our male DNA has been done we are exact matches to some- Day, Dial, Gray, Shavers and probably many more.But the male DNA has been proven up to Elijah SR born 1809/10. The other theory I have is Willis and Olive Stewart had 4 children only one girl, Elizabeth? Look forward for more of your postings!! Thanks a million, Sherelyn

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    • Hi Sherelyn,

      Thank you for reading the blog. I’m so happy you found the blog post on your Willis Bass. I’m also a Bass and Chavis descendant so it was really important for me to get him right. So yes your hunch was absolutely correct about him descending from a female Bass. This is why I’m very cautious about assigning haplogroups to surnames because paternity is an issue and sometimes surnames do get passed down through females as well. I still don’t know who Milly Bass’ parents were but the Basses have been in Granville Co since the 1760s and there were no late newcomers. So she definitely descends from either John Bass or Edward Bass or both. My suspicion is that Olive is a Chavis and a Stewart. Her father was likely the Chavis and her mother the Stewart. I was seen it over and over again where people sometimes list their mother’s maiden name as their own. My ancestor Margaret Evans sometimes listed her maiden name as Walden which was actually her mother’s maiden name. Our people were traditionally matrilineal and that could be the reason for this. The three Chavis men – Evans Chavis, Charles Chavis, and Isaac Chavis who were living next to Willis and Olive are three men that should be looked at as being possible relatives of Olive’s. I’m happy to share with you what I know about them. You can email me kiangalucas@gmail.com.

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  15. Hello,
    It’s Bailey Edsall-Parr, from Facebook. I’ve been reading your blog recently and wanted to ask a question regarding my ancestor Elizabeth Stewart {b. 1695 in VA}. Was she or her children ever at Fort Christiana? I know her children were born under the recording of Bristol Parish in the 1720s {and that some were bounded out to William Eaton} but was curious if they were ever at Fort Christiana or not. They may have been assimilated before then.

    Thank you for your help!

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  16. My gggg grandfather Lightfoot Gibson married Frances Davis in 1793 in Louisa Co, VA.He was mixed race.. I don’t know about her but the Davis’ appeared to be, as well. My dad’s gedmatch number is:F167623. His name is John Otto Gibson and we are documented back into the 1640’s, Charles C ity Co and Surry Co., VA. We are the melungeon Gibsons. Cousins make the best spouses! James Nickens has ery good FB page on Indian mix families of VA and my FB page is Gibsons of Old Jamestwon and Louisa Co, VA. Kianga and I are cousins, way back.

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  17. Excellent blog. I am sharing information from it on Facebook. Granville County North Carolina is a center of my genealogy research, as well as a focus as to my study on Native American history and the history of racial intermixing in the southeastern United States. I have ancestry in Granville and surrounding Wake County. My Hedgepeth/Hutspeth and Medlin maternal family lines are from Granville County. I also have seen the surname Bass and other surnames I see in your blog indicated in my DNA test results matches. As to my possible Native American ancestry, there are no records I can find that indicate admixture. it is confirmed by DNA testing. Specifically I show an interesting match with Pima and Mayan DNA markers that are showing up in members of the Creek and Cherokee nations. More here: http://www.examiner.com/article/south-american-and-mayan-dna-discovered-southern-appalachians

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  18. Yes, UPSadmin, my husband is a direct descendant of William P. “Billy” Cannaday.. I’m thinking Martha (daughter) is Also my husbands’ ancestor! I’m going to check my tree to see for sure if the child he descended from is in fact Martha.I will share any info I have with you.. I haven’t been on this site in awhile so I’m hoping you see this reply.. Also , your grandma who had Indian ancestry, was she on your Cannaday side?

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  19. Yes she is and was named Martha also. I have pictures of my grandmother, her father William, his sister Inez, and his mother. It goes like this William Kennett marries Martha Cannaday, Son Sparrell Kennett marries Belle Furgerson, grandson William Kennett marries Alma Dressler, has my grandmother Martha Kennett. My grandmother once listed Oklahoma as her birth place, but all I can find is Pennsylvania. I know at least one of the Cannaday children was adopted and Indian, with 24 kids probably more were. It would be so great to finally know. My aunt insists Cherokee, they say some went out west, grandma called it the long walk. But she also told my white grandma we were sioux. Another relative said her fathers mother was Sioux and her fathers father was Cherokee. There are lots of Cannaday Kennett marriages of first cousins and double cousins.

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  20. My husbands grandma Martha Cannaday 1810-1866 married his grandpa John Moran, John’s brother is my 5th great grandpa.. My Hubby and I were raised in different states and didn’t meet until our late 20s and we are cousins on 3 diff family lines!

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  21. Page can you email me at rosy . lenz on gmail so I can send you a link to my stuff? I got it wrong my Martha is the daughter of Joshua, son of Patrick billy but I have other family in there and other Martha’s. I also have some pix. You can also reach my at underwaterpanthersociety.org

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  22. Hi, Carole, please give me a call at207/884-7117 before 8pm, EST, and leave your phone number and a time I can call you. I have loads of info and simply can’t write it all out. It’s quite complex but fairly connected and I may be able to answer some of your questions. Also, the Natives certainly don’t believe in the Bering Strait story and in the book “1492” it has been reexamined.

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  23. Hi there Kianga! I am the “waniehol” from Ancestry that many photos on this blog are from. I have some others as well. I was so surprised to find this site and love all of the research that you have done. I am a historian and I’ve been doing genealogy work for over 20 years. Please contact me at ellemoorehp[at]gmail.com as I’d love to go hear from you!

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  24. I just discovered your site and I am looking forward to what I can discover.

    In the article “The Pamunkey Origin of the FPOC Howell Family”. A correction should be in the paragraph starting with “Another daughter of John Howell and Susan Pearman”……

    The sentence in this paragraph stating “Kate Wynn and her husband Otho Gray are the great-grandparents of current Pamunkey Chief Robert Gray” is incorrect. The Robert Gray noted here is not a current Pamunkey chief.

    Also the statement of Lena Lucy Howell photo, and the second photo of Kate Wynn,…Otho Floyd Gray, . and Luther Gordon Gray, with the statement “Kate Wynn is the great-grandmother of the current chief of the Pamunkey tribe current chief” is incorrect. The Robert Gray mentioned should be Robert Gordon Gray, Sr., the only son of Luther Gordon Gray, (no direct connection with the chief of the Pamunkey tribe).

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