Evans Family of Granville County – descendants of Jane Gibson “a free Indian woman”

The Native American/”free colored” Evans family of Granville County directly descend from Morris Evans (1665-1739) and Jane Gibson (1660/1670 – 1738) of Charles City County, VA. The Evans family resettled in and became a core part of Granville County’s Native American community in the 1760s immediately following the initial settlement of the founding  Chavis, Harris, Hawley, Pettiford, Anderson, Bass, and Goins families. In this blog post I will document the Evans family from their earliest documented origins from a “free Indian woman” known as Jane Gibson the elder, to their settlement in Granville County. A word of caution: “Evans” is among the most common surnames dating back to colonial times, therefore not all “Evans” families are genealogically related. There were a few “free colored” Evans families originating in Virginia and it is not known if an how they may all be related. The focus of this blog post is about documenting the branch of the Evans family that begins with Morris Evans and his wife Jane Gibson. I do discuss two additional Evans families at the end, that may or may not be related.


Jane Gibson the Elder, “a free Indian woman”

Morris Evans’ (1665-1739) wife Jane Gibson (1660/1670-1738), had a mother also named Jane Gibson. To distinguish between the two women, the mother is referred to as Jane Gibson the elder (born 1640/1650). The elder Jane Gibson was called “a free Indian woman” by some of her descendants who were illegally enslaved. Though the Evans and Gibson families were free-born, that did not prevent some colonists from illegally enslaving them. Apparently, some of the descendants of Morris Evans and Jane Gibson’s  daughter Frances Evans (1700-1771) were enslaved by a colonist named Goodrich Lightfoot. They were originally “bound out” to Lightfoot to be indentured servants but he instead enslaved them and after his death, they were subsequently sold to several slave owners.  The enslaved Evans later sued for their freedom and provided information that they descended from a free Indian woman – Jane Gibson the elder.

The petition of Charles Evans, Amey Evans, Sukey Evans, Sisar Evans, Solomon Evans, Frankey Evans, Sally Evans, Milly Evans, Adam Evans and Hannah Evans holden in slavery by Lewis Allen, of the County of Halifax humbly sheweth: that your petitioners are descendants from Jane Gibson, a free Indian woman..

Source: http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~genealogyfriend/evans/gib_evans.htm

You can review the documentation on Deloris Williams’ website where she has graciously transcribed the chancery court documents and it is really worth a read, if you’re not familiar with these records.

I also found in the Saint Stephen’s Parish records for New Kent County, that Goodrich Lightfoot (the man who enslaved the Evans) owned an “Indian” slave named Charles who died on October 9, 1722. I’m unsure if this Charles is from the Evans family, but it certainly appears Goodrich Lightfoot enslaved multiple Native Americans.

Source: The Parish Register of Saint Peter's, New Kent County, Va. from 1680 to 1787
Source: The Parish Register of Saint Peter’s, New Kent County, Va. from 1680 to 1787

Also noteworthy, the Native American/”free colored” Howell family of Granville County descends from a woman who was a servant in the home of Goodrich Lightfoot’s brother Sherwood Lightfoot of Saint Stephen’s Parish in New Kent County, VA. And after both the Evans and Howell families came to Granville County, they intermarried.

The exact tribal origin of the Evans family has also been a subject of a lot of debate among researchers. Morris Evans was noted as being a free person of color and we know from DNA testing that he was of at least partial African descent. It is unknown if his background included any Native American ancestry. Although he was born around 1665, the first confirmed records for him were at the end of his life in 1738. So there is a lot about Morris Evans’ early life that we do not know about.

However Morris Evans’ wife’s mother Jane Gibson the elder and thus his wife were noted as being “Indian”, yet no tribe specified. Charles City County, VA which is where Jane Gibson the elder resided, is located in the heart of Powhatan territory and perhaps that is where her tribal ancestry comes from. There is another Powhatan (specifically Nansemond) descended family of Granville County – the Basses, that I blogged about previously and the Evans intermarried with them in Granville. There was also a Walter Gibson recorded as a chieftan in the Tuscarora “Indian Woods” reservation land deeds in Bertie County, NC in the 1770s. However, I have not seen any credible information that names his parents or children, so I’m not sure if he is at all connected to Jane Gibson of Charles City County. Another matter to consider is that Morris Evans and Jane Gibson’s son Charles Evans moved to southside Virginia by the 1730s, about a decade after the Saponi reservation at nearby Fort Christanna was closed. Charles Evans and his family  intermarried with the Saponi descendants residing in Virginia. The maiden name of Charles Evans’ wife is unknown, so more research into her identity is needed.


The Evans Move from the Tidewater to Southside Virginia

The Evans family line that came to Granville were not enslaved and as a result, they are well documented. Morris Evans and Jane Gibson also had two sons named Charles Evans (1696-1760) and Morris Evans Jr (1710-1754). Charles and Morris Jr were born in the Tidewater area of Virginia (York County) like their parents, but relocated to the southside Virginia counties of Brunswick, Mecklenburg, and Lunenburg (Lunenburg was formed from Brunswick in 1746 and Mecklenburg was formed from Lunenburg in 1765). Charles Evans moved first in the 1730s and his younger brother Morris Evans Jr moved later in the 1750s. Living next to the Evans families in Southside Virginia during this time period were other notable “free colored”/Native American families such as: Walden, Kersey, Harris, Brandon/Branham, Stewart, Chavis, Guy and Corn. I point this out because the Evans intermarried with most of these Southside families and they then moved together into the North Carolina border counties, including Granville.

Morris Evans Jr (1710-154) was married to a white woman named Amy Poole, who was the daughter of William Poole. After Morris Evans’ death, Amy remarried a John Wright and became known as “Amy Wright”. Her father William Poole in 1753, gave land in Lunenburg Co, VA to Morris Evans Jr and Amy Poole’s son named Richard Evans (1750-1794). This same Richard Evans later moved to Robeson Co, NC and is the most likely ancestor of the Evans family found within the Lumbee Tribe of Robeson Co.

Charles Evans (1696-1760) remained in southside Virginia until his death in 1760 and we have a good record of who his children were through land transactions and wills. Unfortunately not much is known about Charles Evans’ wife aside from her first name being Sarah. Charles Evans’ children were:

  1. Thomas Evans (b. 1734) – tithable in his father’s 1751 Lunenburg Co household. Was in very poor economic standing as his children were bound out because he could not provide for them. Thomas only received one shilling from his father’s will because he was “undutiful”. His wife may have been a Stewart. Some of his children intermarried with the “free colored”/Native American Jeffries family and moved to Orange Co, NC. This is the same Jeffries family that is a core family of the Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation.
  2. Major Evans (1733-1814) – moved to Granville Co, NC and is the primary ancestor of the Evans of Granville Co. Will be discussed in the next section.
  3. Charles Evans (b. 1737) – remained in southside Virginia. In 1782, he was compensated for beef he provided to the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. His daughter Nanny Evans married Eaton Walden.
  4. Richard Evans (b. 1740) – remained in southside Virginia. He did not leave a will, so his apparent children are not verified. He may be the father of Richard Evans b. 1772 who relocated to Chatham Co, NC. An earlier Isaac Evans (b. 1735) was the first “free colored” Evans to appear in the Randolph Co (which borders Chatham) records, so some of the apparent descendants of Richard Evans may in fact be the descendants of Isaac Evans. And it is not currently known if and how Isaac Evans may be related to the family of Morris Evans/Jane Gibson.
  5. Sarah Evans (b. 1742)  – mentioned in her father’s will but unknown what happened to her next
  6. Joyce Evans (b. 1743) – mentioned in her father’s will but unknown what happened to her next
  7. Erasmus Evans (b. 1745) – had two sons named Anthony and Isham who were bound out. Anthony was called “Anthony Chavis”, so Erasmus’ wife was likely a Chavis. Anthony Evans/Chavis moved around a bit before settling in Chatham Co where he left a will but apparently no heirs.

From here, we will focus our discussion on Charles Evans’ son Major Evans (1733-1814) who is the main progenitor of the Evans in Granville County.


Major Evans (1733-1814) comes to Granville County

Charles Evans’ son Major Evans (1733-1814) who is the direct lineal ancestor of the vast majority of the Granville County Evans first appears in the Granville tax lists in the 1760s. By the 1780s and 1790s he had recorded several land transactions in Granville and short-lived Bute County (modern Franklin and Warren). Notably in 1780, he purchased 100 acres of land from Phillip Chavis off the Tar River in an area known as the Buffalo Race Path near Buffalo Creek. Phillip Chavis also sold Major Evans an additional 500 acres along the Granville/Franklin line. Phillip Chavis (b. 1726) was the son of William Chavis (1709-1777) – the original Granville land owner and founding community member. Phillip Chavis had numerous land transactions with his father William Chavis around Buffalo Creek and he also settled his father’s estate. In fact, Major Evans’ wife Martha Ann (maiden name unknown) may have been a Chavis given the close relationship between Major Evans and the William Chavis family.

It’s also important to remember that William Chavis’ wife was Frances Gibson was the daughter of Gibson Gibson (1660-1727) of Charles City County, VA. Perhaps Jane Gibson the elder and Gibson Gibson were related, given the shared Gibson surname in the same location. We know from witness testimony that Jane Gibson the elder had two children – Jane Gibson the younger who married Morris Evans and a son named George Gibson (born 1665) who died without having children. So William Chavis’ father-in-law Gibson Gibson could not have been a son of Jane Gibson the elder, but perhaps a brother or nephew. This is only speculation at the moment and hopefully some more documentation may confirm these suspicions.

Phillip Chavis land sold to Major Evans in 1780. Buffalo Race Paths - Granville County.
16 Feb 1780 Granville County, North Carolina – Phillip Chavis sells land along the “Buffalo Race Paths” to Major Evans. This land is very close to the Granille (now Vance) and Franklin County border
Major Evans land purchase on the Buckhorn Branch in Newlight Creek in far southeastern Granville County, close to the Franklin and Wake County borders.
Major Evans land purchase on the Buckhorn Branch in Newlight Creek in far southeastern Granville County, close to the Franklin and Wake County borders.
Circled in red are the approximate locations of Major Evans land purchases in and around Granville County.  There are at least two locations named
Circled in red are the approximate locations of Major Evans land purchases in and around Granville County. There are at least two locations named “Buffalo Race Paths” – one in Shocco township, Warren County where the old Bute County courthouse was located and one located on the Granville (now Vance) and Franklin county line. Major Evans’ “Buffalo Race Paths” land appears to be the latter one. This land bordered the Chavis family land and Snelling family land. The Snellings are Chavis descendants and intermarried with the Evans.
Source: http://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/ncmaps/id/3569

Whatever the exact relationship between Major Evans and the Chavis family turns out to be, these land transactions placed Major Evans and his family in the heart of the Granville County Native American community. It’s also important to note that Major Evans still owned land in Mecklenburg County, VA and appears on the tax lists there in the 1780s, so he likely was moving back and forth (a very short distance) between his Mecklenburg County property and his Granville County property. This close relationship between the two locations explains why many other the Native American/”free colored” families from the Mecklenburg area including the Howell, Guy, KerseyBrandon/Branham, Cousins, and Mayo families (most of whom had intermarried with the Evans) continued moving into Granville up through the first couple of decades of the 1800s. There was a Major Evans recorded in the Warren County tax list for the Six Pound District in 1814 and if this is the same Major Evans which it likely is, then it shows he moved yet again in his final years.

Nearly all of Major Evans’ children and descendants intermarried with families from the Granville Native American community. Below is a list of his children and their spouses:

1. * Morris Evans (1750-1834) married second Lydia Anderson, his first wife is unknown.

2. * Gilbert Evans (1757-1827) married Phoebe Lumbley. Phoebe was apparently white, and Gilbert appears in tax and census records as white as do their children. Because of strict laws forbidding interracial marriages, it could be that Gilbert “passed” for white in order to have a white spouse. This is a pattern that I have seen before.

3. Burwell Evans (1758-1820) married Mary Mitchell.

4. * John Evans (1759-1781) unwed and died in battle during the Revolutionary War.

5. Elizabeth Evans (1780-before 1860) married Isaac Chavis but they later separated.

6. Nelly Evans (1762-1849) married William Taborn

7. * William Evans (1764-1823) married Sarah Hays who was apparently white. Like his brother Gilbert, William “passed” for white and it was likely because he had a white spouse.

8. Sarah Evans (1770 – before 1860) married George Anderson.

* Paul Heinegg in his Evans family sketch on his website freeafricanamericans, lists the brothers Morris, Gilbert, John, and William Evans as the *possible* sons of Gilbert Evans b. 1730. However genealogist Deloris Williams has more up to date research on the Evans family and I agree with her conclusions.

Most of these families resided in Granville and Wake Counties. It is likely Major Evans’ land purchase in Newlight Creek which borders Wake County, precipitated the movement of many of his descendants into Wake.

The interconnectedness of the Evans family to the Granville County Native American community is also evident in the division of the estate of William Evans (1789-1871), a resident of Fishing Creek, Granville County. Deloris Williams has transcribed his estate record here. William was the grandson of Major Evans. Major’s daughter Elizabeth Evans had a child “out of wedlock” before she married Isaac Chavis.  Though William Evans had been married to Frances Anderson, by the time of his death he was widowed and had no living heirs. So instead he divided his estate among some members of the Native American community including the Anderson, Boon, Pettiford, Hawley, Mayo, Curtis, Taborn, Jones, and Evans families.

Below are some pictures of Granville County Evans who are directly descended from Major Evans (and further back descended from Morris Evans and Jane Gibson):

Pantheyer Brandon (1851-1934). She was the daughter of Hilliard Evans and Betsy Brandon. Because her parents were unwed, she took her mother's last name. Though Pantheyer's marriage record to Junius Thomas Howell lists her father as
Pantheyer Brandon (1851-1934) of Fishing Creek, Granville County. She was the daughter of Hilliard Evans and Betsy Brandon. Because her parents were unwed, she took her mother’s last name. Though Pantheyer’s marriage record to Junius Thomas Howell lists her father as “unknown”, Hilliard Evans identity was confirmed through Pantheyer’s brother Osh Brandon’s marriage record. Pantheyer’s sister Hilliard “Hettie” Brandon was also named after their father. Pantheyer’s mother Betsy Brandon later had several more children with William Peace. Hilliard Evans later married Louisa Mitchell and relocated to Ohio. Probably only his oldest children with Betsy Brandon had memories of him before he moved out of state.
Source: Ancestry, Username: rthomas1973

Pantheyer Brandon’s lineage back to Major Evans is as follows:

Pantheyer Brandon; Hilliard Evans; Thomas Evans; Morris Evans; Major Evans.

She is also descended from the Brandon, Bass, and Anderson families.

John Evans (1830 - 1892) and his wife Martha Harris. John was the son of Polly Evans and an unknown father. His mother Polly later married Johnson Reed. The family relocated to Ohio by 1860. Source: E. Howard Evans
John Evans (1830 – 1892) and his wife Martha Harris. John was the son of Polly Evans and an unknown father. His mother Polly later married Johnson Reed. The family relocated to Ohio by 1860. John Evans was first cousins to Pantheyer Brandon pictured above.
Source: E. Howard Evans

John Evans’ lineage back to Major Evans is as follows:

John Evans; Polly Evans; Thomas Evans; Morris Evans; Major Evans

John Evans is also descended from the Bass and Anderson families.

Standing on the left if John Evans' son Thomas McDaniel Evans  (1861-1929). Standing to his right is Thomas' son Howard Evans and seated is Thomas' daughter Ruth Evans. John Evans moved to Ohio by 1860, where his family continued to live. Source: E. Howard Evans
Standing on the left is John Evans’ son Thomas McDaniel Evans (1861-1929). Standing to his right is Thomas’ son Howard Evans and seated is Thomas’ daughter Ruth Evans. John Evans moved to Ohio by 1860, where his family continued to live.
Source: E. Howard Evans
Mary Etta Guy (1866 - 1965) a resident of Fishing Creek, Granville County. Mary Etta descends from several Granville County Native American families. She descends from the Evans (Morris Evans-Jane Gibson), Taborn, Guy, and Chavis families and was married to a Tyler. Mary Etta spent her entire life in Fishing Creek until after her husband's death in 1943 when she joined some of her family who had relocated to New York. Source: Carole Allen
Mary Etta Guy (1866 – 1965) a resident of Fishing Creek, Granville County. Mary Etta descends from several Granville County Native American families. She descends from the Evans (Morris Evans-Jane Gibson), Taborn, Guy, and Chavis families and was married to a Tyler. Mary Etta spent her entire life in Fishing Creek until after her husband’s death in 1943 when she joined some of her family who had relocated to New York.
Source: Carole Allen
Ira Evans 1879-1968
Ira Evans (1879-1968) was the son of Lewis Evans (1847-1917) and  Zibra Bookram (b. 1859). His is a direct lineal descendants of Morris Evans/Jane Gibson through their grandson Major Evans. Ira descends from the Evans, Gibson, Bookram, Bass, Anderson, and Scott families and lived in Durham Co, NC. Source: Ancestry, Username: LaMonica Williams.
Ada Evans
Ada Evans (1885-1954) was the daughter of Thomas Evans and Mary Bookram. She is double first cousins with Ira Evans pictured above. Ada was first married to Earnest Day and second married to William Glover. She lived in Granville and Durham Counties. Please note that most family tree on Ancestry have confused this Ada Evans for her older first cousin Ada Evans ( b 1877) who was the daughter of Sallie Evans.  Source: Ancestry, Username: MichaelSmith493

What about the families of Thomas Evans (1723-1788) and James Evans (1720-1786)??

 

Evans Migration Map.004
Map following the movement of the Evans family. The Morris Evans-Jane Gibson line is shown in red, the James Evans line is shown in blue, and the Thomas Evans line is shown in purple. The dates indicate the earliest records for the Evans family in those locations. © Kianga Lucas

 

So as I mentioned at the beginning of the blog post, there were other early “free colored” Evans families in Virginia that may be related to Morris Evans/Jane Gibson. In particular, there are two two early Evans’ ancestors that need to be discussed.

 

Thomas Evans (1723-1788):

One family begins with a Thomas Evans (1723-1788) who lived in the southside Virginia counties of Lunenburg and Mecklenburg. His parents at this time are unknown. His wife’s name is also unknown but she was a Walden.  Thomas Evans and his descendants usually lived close to the known descendants of Morris Evans/Jane Gibson. In fact, this Thomas Evans (1723-1788), Charles Evans and Major Evans (grandsons of Morris Evans/Jane Gibson) all together on 9 April 1782 in Mecklenburg County court proved their claim to be paid for 225 lbs of beef they each supplied the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. This suggests a close relationship between the three men (two of whom are documented siblings).

All of Thomas Evans’ children married other closely related Native American families of the area including Chavis, Brandon, Drew and Kersey. Thankfully Thomas Evans left a 1787 (proved 1788) Mecklenburg County will that named his heirs. His heirs were also named in a subsequent lawsuit. Many of Thomas’ descendants moved into and intermarried with the Native American community in Granville including his grandson Isaac Chavis who married and later separated from the previously mentioned Elizabeth Evans who was the daughter of Major Evans. Additional surnames that Thomas Evans’ descendants married into when they moved to North Carolina include: LocklearIvey and Hawley. All of this suggests a close relationship between Thomas Evans and the descendants of Morris Evans/Jane Gibson but I’m not sure what it is. I feel fairly confident that this Thomas Evans is related to Morris Evans/Jane Gibson but I’m still working on seeing where exactly he fits in. Thomas Evans and his unnamed Walden wife were my 6th great-grandparents.

Sally Kersey
Sally Kersey (1828-1911) was the daughter of Benjamin Kersey and Sally (maiden name not known). Her grandparents were William Kersey and Polly Evans. Polly Evans was a daughter of Thomas Evans (1723-1788). She was married to William Tyler and was a lifelong resident of the Native American community in Granvilly, in Fishing Creek township. Source: Ancestry, Username: wanhiehol

James Evans (1720-1786):

And second there is James Evans (1720-1786) who first appears in the records in Surry County, VA in 1746. In that year he was charged with adultery for living with Eleanor Walden. Eleanor is presumed to later be his wife and mother of his children. Unfortunately, Surry County suffered major record loss, so further details on James Evans’ early life may have been destroyed. Such records may have named his parents, because James’ parents are unknown. By the 1750s, James Evans was living in Edgecombe County, NC as indicated by land purchases and militia records. Notably James Evans is listed next to several members of the “free colored”/Native American Scott family that was of Saponi descent and these families later intermarried. This part of Edgecombe became Halifax County in 1758, and James Evans continues to appear in the Halifax records. By 1786, his wife Eleanor (Walden) Evans was listed as a head of household in the Halifax records, indicating that James had died some time previous to that date.

James Evans’ descendants continued living in the Halifax County area. Again, please note that Paul Heinegg has different information for the descendants of James Evans. Instead I’m using the genealogy provided by Deloris Williams which I believe is more accurate. James Evans had a son by the same name James Evans Jr (1750-1830) who lived in Halifax Co. James Jr had a son named Leven Evans (1775 – before 1850) who is the main source of the Evans found within the state-recognized Haliwa-Saponi tribe in Hollister. Leven Evans’ first wife was Kizzie but her maiden name is unknown. His second wife was Harriet Scott (b. 1811). Harriet was from the same Scott family that her grandfather James Evans (1720-1786) enlisted in the Edgecombe Co militia with. Leven Evans’ descendants continued to intermarry with “core” families of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe including Richardson, Lynch, Silver, Mills, and Copeland.

Deloris Williams also noted connections between Leven Evans’ son Archibald Evans (1793 – before 1870) and the descendants of Morris Evans-Jane Gibson here. However, recent DNA testing suggests that the descendants of Leven Evans are not related to Morris Evans/Jane Gibson. At least 7 direct male lineal descendants of Morris Evans have done yDNA testing and their haplogroup is E-M2 which is a sub Saharan African haplogroup. At least one direct male lineal descendant of Leven Evans has done yDNA testing and his haplogroup is R1b which is Western European (most commonly Irish). This means we know that Leven Evans and Morris Evans do not share a common male Evans ancestor. But it’s possible that the Leven Evans branch may descend from a female Evans ancestor which would account for the different yDNA haplogroups. Like the paper trail, DNA results can offer a clue but not the full story about one’s heritage.

Fox Evans
Fox Evans (1882-1932) was the son of Elijah Evans and Jane Cornelia Richardson. He is a direct lineal descendant of James Evans (1720-1786) through Leven Evans. Fox Evans was married to Leacy Silver and lived in Halifax County, NC. Source: Ancestry, Username: lynnmcaldwell1
image1
Major Blake Evans (1879-1959) is pictured with his first wife Adeline Virginia Richardson (1876-1920). Major Blake Evans was a brother to Fox Evans pictured above. He is a direct lineal descendant of James Evans (1720-1786) through his grandson Leven Evans. Major Blake Evans lived in Halifax Co, NC his entire life where some of his descendants are among the Haliwa-Saponi tribe. Source: Desmond Ellsworth
image2
Pictured are children of Major Blake Evans (1879-1959) who resided in Halifax Co, NC. Source: Desmond Ellsworth

 

Mollie Evans
Mollie Evans (1892-1938) was the daughter of William Evans and Martha Richardson. She is also direct lineal descendant of James Evans (1720-1786) through Leven Evans. Mollie was married to Arch Silver and lived in Halifax County, NC. Source: Ancestry, Username: GwendolynJohnson84
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36 thoughts on “Evans Family of Granville County – descendants of Jane Gibson “a free Indian woman”

  1. Have you done enough research on the Evans families to connect a Samuel Evans who died in Person co in 1850? He would have been born around 1775 based on his daughter’s birth in 1795. She was Elizabeth Evans married to Richard Ryland Moore in Person co on 10-5-1819. This line is a complete dead end for me.

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    • Hi Ken Dalton. Thank you for checking out the blog. I’m looking up your Samuel Evans now in Person County. I’m showing a Samuel Evans in the 1820 census head of household of 7 free white persons and 10 slaves. And Samuel Evans in the 1830 census head of household of 4 free white persons and 10 slaves. I have not traced any of the Evans to Person County, but there are so many branches of this Evans tree, so I can’t rule it out. But I’m also not seeing anything to make a connection. Most of the Evans of this family were “free people of color” but most notably the families of GIlbert Evans and William Evans Jr who I listed in the blog, had white spouses and they along with their descendants were most often classified as white. You can find more information about Gilbert Evans on Deloris Williams’ website here: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dwilliams-1&id=I3935
      And you can find more information about William Evans Jr here:
      http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dwilliams-1&id=I3936
      Neither men though are showing a Samuel Evans in their families.

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  2. Excellent work!!! My paternal line lived in Fishing Creek for several generations, all the names you have listed are familiar.
    Have you any information on the Mary Evans(b. 1820) in the 1850 Granville County census in the household of Henry and Martha Minor? I ask this because according to my familys oral history her daughter (my GG Grandmother, Parthenia) changed her name from Evans to Minor. I have seen several other researchers link to this same Mary Evans with different lineages and outcomes for her and her children.
    And are you related to Coach John Lucas?

    Thanks for your blog!

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    • Anthony,

      Thank you for getting in touch. I know exactly who your Mary Evans is. She is definitely from this line of Evans (Morris Evans/Jane Gibson) but I have not been able to verify her parents. If you’d like, we can continue this conversation via email and see if we can learn more about Mary Evans from the info we both have. I look forward to hearing from you. kiangalucas@gmail.com
      Kianga

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  3. What information do you have on the relationship of Betsy Brandon and William Peace, and are you referring to the William Peace (of Granville county) that is the son of John Peace and Margaret Scott? Do you also have any info that suggests Admond Brandon (b.1857- d.1948 Granville Co, NC son of Betsy Brandon, and married Delia Braswell) is the son of William? I know Betsy Brandon had many children (I assume all were out of wedlock, therefore had her surname) and with more than one partner; one confirmed partner is from the Evans family, and the father of her other children (including Admond Brandon) are unconfirmed. Any info you can provide is much appreciated.

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    • Hi Ashley, Thank you for commenting. So from the records that are available I believe Betsy Brandon’s children were fathered by two men – Hilliard Evans and William Peace. Hilliard fathered the four oldest children whose ages are clustered together – Osh, Hilliard/Hettie, Crutch, and Pantheyer. William Peace likely fathered the remaining children whose ages are also clustered together – Admond, Amanda, Peyton, Walter, Maranda, Delia. Unfortunately on the death certificates for Betsy’s children their father’s name is not typically listed but on Peyton and Maranda’s death records, William “Billie” Peace is identified. I don’t have any specific records in which Admond identified his father as William Peace, but by looking at the ages of Betsy’s children and the records that are available, I’d say the preponderance of the evidence suggests William Peace fathered Admond. I have not fully verified William Peace’s identify but I believe he is the William Peace who is white, and living in Fishing Creek right next to the Brandon family. Because of laws against interracial marriage, Betsy Brandon and William Peace would not have been able to marry. But this did not prevent relationships from happening and by looking at the many children William Peace likely fathered with Betsy Brandon, it seems they had a long term relationship. This William Peace of Fishing Creek was also legally single and never married, which may be an additional clue about his relationship with Betsy. What throws me off about this William Peace who was neighbors to the Brandon family is that he is consistently listed as “deaf & dumb” in the census. I don’t know how serious to take that description of him and I don’t know if that would prevent him from fathering children. Still many questions there. Also, it appears Betsy Brandon never filed any “bastard bonds” (child support) for any of her children, so I don’t know how she was able to support them all. Certainly her parents assisted but that is rather odd. I wonder if looking through wills filed by the Peace family, if we’ll find any mention of financial support for Betsy’s children.

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  4. […] Thomas Brandon was mistreated by Hutchins Burton and complained to the courts to be freed from his indenture. And on 13 Jul 1764 Thomas Brandon was bound to Jacob Chavis (1736-1808). Jacob Chavis was the husband of Elizabeth Evans (1745-1814) which is probably why on 3 January 1771, Thomas Brandon married Elizabeth Evans’ sister Margaret Evans (b. 1753). Elizabeth and Margaret Evans were the children of Thomas Evans (1723-1788) and his unnamed Walden wife. I previously discussed Thomas Evans in this blog post. […]

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  5. I was honored to see the photo of Fox Evans on your blog. It hung for many years on Grandmother’s wall in Flint, Mi. Her name was Bufort Evans Winston, daughter of Leacy Silver & Fox Evans. When we were kids, we joked about the photo of the “white guy.” It wasn’t until we were grown, that we really understood who the man in the photo really was, a link to a rich family history!

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  6. Renita (Lynch) Williams,

    I was really excited to learn my sister was going to dig deeper into the history of our fathers family. We learned a lot growing up from family but , this really gave more details.
    I saw the family reunion photo and my great grand parents photo’s it brought tears.
    I’m Major Blake Evans and Adeline Virginia Richardson great granddaughter .
    They’re youngest daughter Betty Lou Evans-(Lynch) who fell asleep in death 3/ 2007 89 yrs young she had (2) son’s the eldest William Haywood Lynch is my Dad I’m his eldest daughter her eldest granddaughter.
    She’s the one in the reunion photo in front with the light blue dress and glasses. I remember the day that was taken. I wish I could see some of the photo’s I saw at the old homestead of her mother and father where she grew up. No one seems to know where they are 😦
    Anyway your hard work really is appreciated and gave us even more of a clear understanding as to why reflect the generations in the pass and our parents returned back to the homeland where my Dad passed away (5yrs ago) in Hollister NC, May 29th . Mom is still with us, things came full circle for them. Wow what a legacy full and rich.

    Thanks again

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    • Dear Ebony,

      Have you read Deloris Williams’ research? This is her file on Mourning Evans which includes all the primary source references that Deloris has found.
      Mourning was the daughter of James Evans b. 1720, who I discuss at the end of this blog post. At this time, the yDNA evidence shows that the James Evans b. 1720 line comes from a different set of Evans than the Morris Evans/Jane Gibson line. However, some members of the two different Evans families did intermarry, so you’ll find people who are related to both Evans lineages.

      http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dwilliams-1&id=I11774

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    • I’m sorry I don’t recognize that name. My grandmother (Betty Lou Evans-(Lynch) her oldest sister ( Mary Evans- West) I only got to meet just a few of her children while growing up. The age group would be in there mid to late 50’s, 60’s and I don’t think they grow up in that immediate area. Don’t know if any of this will help you connect anything or anyone.

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  7. Hi Kianga,

    I was interested in learning about the Native American tribes that resided in
    Surry Co., VA in the 1700’s and came across your blog. I am of Evans decent from Surry Co., VA, and was very impressed by your work. I can find a great grandmother Dolly Evans 1775-1845, who married a Peter Hamlin 7-13-1797. I believe that she is possibly the mother of my (4) grandfather Harrison Evans who had a son named Adolphus Evans with Parthena Wooton. I can’t find anything else beyond Dolly or whether or not she had any siblings as well as Adolphus having any siblings.C an you help? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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  8. I am impressed with your research. I am a descendent of Morris Evans 1665-1739 and Jane Gibson 1660/1670-1738. My father is the grandson of Lewis/Louis Evans and Zibba Bookam. My father’s father was Benjamin Evans who was married to Lizzie Shaw. My father was Ben Wesley Evans. Thanks for sharing my family history.

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  9. Hello, I am a descendant of Sarah Evans, who we recently figured out by mitochondrial DNA was the sister of Nancy Evans, wife of Elijah Gumbs Boon of Northampton County, NC. Their parents are said to be William Evans and Sarah Hays, which I am currently working on confirming. If so, Sarah Hays’ mitochondrial DNA haplogroup was V subhaplogroup V7 as both my maternal line and the descendant of Nancy Evans are a perfect match. I am now following your blog, thank you for writing!

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    • My 5th great-grandfather, David Bly, bought land from William and Ann Gatewood. David lived next door to Stanhope Evans, a son of Thomas Evans. I know David was married to a woman named Mary who I suspect was a daughter of Thomas Evans and Elizabeth Gatewood. Mary & David Bly signed for purchases for a few properties in Amherst County. In 1770, David bought 130 acres of land from William and Ann Gatewood, a brother and sister-in-law of Elizabeth.
      Mary & David had a son named John, my 4th great-grandfather. They moved to Madison County, Kentucky. Looking on Ancestry are a mess of info about children, parents, etc. I don’t know which one to believe.

      Liked by 1 person

      • After I made this comment here I realized I had mixed up families. It looks like my Nancy Evans was the daughter of man named Henry Evans in Northampton County, so far no info on the mother.

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  10. My 5th great-grandfather, David Bly, bought land from William and Ann Gatewood. David lived next door to Stanhope Evans, a son of Thomas Evans. I know David was married to a woman named Mary who I suspect was a daughter of Thomas Evans. Mary & David Bly signed for purchases for a few properties in Amherst County. Mary & David had a son named John, my 4th great-grandfather. They moved to Madison County, Kentucky. I saw on Ancestry that a Mary Evans, a daughter of Thomas Evans, died in 1814 in Bath County, Kentucky. I’m trying to prove that this Mary was my 5th great-grandmother. There is no marriage bond for David Bly & Mary in Amherst.

    You mentioned that all of Thomas’ children married into Native American families. I found clues online that David was the son of William Bly of Prince George County, and an unknown mother. Any help will be appreciated to trying to prove that Mary Evans was indeed the wife of David Bly. Thank you. – Sean

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  11. I was on the wrong Thomas Evans. Didn’t mean for any inconvenience. My Thomas Evans was married to Elizabeth Gatewood. The Admins’ Thomas Evans also had a daughter named Mary, no wonder the confusion on my part.

    Someone else is trying to research my Thomas Evans. He was my 6th great-grandfather.

    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=Search&includedb=&lang=en&ti=&surname=bly&stype=Exact&given=david&bplace=&byear=&brange=0&dplace=&dyear=&drange=0&mplace=&myear=&mrange=0&father=&mother=&spouse=Mary+Evans&skipdb=&period=All&submit.x=Search

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  12. Stuff happens Sean. I too saw that link, and it seems plausible. It looks like your Thomas Evans was a Monacan Indian. Without birth records, it would probably be impossible for you to be a tribal member. They have a so-called “1700 Tribal Rolls” which the date is totally implausible. There were no whites in that area in that time period (maybe a few, but not too many). It seems as though you have to be a descendant of those who lived on Johns Settlement, or you’re pretty much screwed as getting recognized as a Monacan (no offense). I wonder if the admin has anything to say about this.

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  13. My 4th great-grandmother ( in maternal grandfather “Barnes” ancestry ) is Nancy Evans who married Allen Sweat. I have ran across differing names for her father. *Morris Evans and Lidda Anderson // *Charles Evans Jr // *and Rueben Evans who signed her Marriage bond. Rueben married a Mary Pruitt but I have no other info for him? Do you happen to have any info on who Nancy’s father was ? I have tested for Family Finder and MTDNA at FTDNA. Appreciate any info and love to find some photos of my ancestry line of Sweat/Swett and Evans.

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  14. Hi Kianga,
    I am very impressed by your Evans family blog, so much so, I’ve decided to update my Evans family trees, and make the Evans family a core family of the Lost Creek Settlement. In your Evans family blog, you state that Richard Evans had a daughter named Nancy, who married a Wiley Locklear. One of Lost Creek’s pioneer settlers was Abel Stewart. Abel Stewart was married to a Nancy Evans, as well. In the 1830, Pittsboro, Chatham, North Carolina census, Abel Stewart and Richard Evans are next door neighbors. How confident are you that Richard’s Nancy married Wiley Locklear, and not Abel Stewart?
    Thanks

    Like

    • Hi all,
      Paul Heinegg identifies the Richard Evans b.1774 of Chatham County as being the the son of Richard Evans b.1740, son of Charles Evans b.1696, son of Morris Evans b.1665 and Jane Gibson. Hopefully I’ve answered my own question.

      Like

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